News & Events

RCTE Alum Susan Meyers is coming out with an academic book and a novel: Del Otro Lado: Literacy and Migration across the U.S.-Mexico Border   Failing the Trapeze (winner of the 2013 Nilsen Literary Prize for first novel)  
Joel Hans, current Fiction Editor with Fairy Tale Review, was featured in a round-up of editors' "Favorite Scary Stories" in The Masters Review alongside esteemed editors from Tin House, The Paris Review, and elsewhere! Huzzah Joel!  Read Joel's poignant piece on "the threat of E.T." here.  
The Feel Trio by Fred Moten, which was published by Joshua Marie Wilkinson's small press Letter Machine Editions, has been named as a Finalist for the National Book Award.  
Jon Riccio's poem "Semi-Newport" appears in Issue 2 of Four Chambers.  
Fri, 11/07/2014 - 12:00pm
1. Professor Sonia Shiri, School of Middle Eastern and North African Studies
Revolution in Tunisia: Protest Signs, Graffiti and Facebook
 
2. Professor Fenton Johnson, Dept. of English
Power and Obedience:  Restoring Pacifism to American Politics
Throughout American history, pacifism, though never a majority sentiment, has played a role in shaping national perspectives on war and peace.  But as...
Fri, 12/05/2014 - 12:00pm

1. Professor John Warnock, Dept. of English

"Launch Control"

 

A reading from a piece about a visit in March 2012 to  a Minuteman III Launch Control Center in the missile field outside of F. E. Warren Air Force Base in Cheyenne, Wyoming

 

2. Professor Johanna Skibsrud, Dept. of English
"If I Were Human: Reflections on 100 Years of War"
Thu, 04/16/2015 (All day)
Please save the date for the 27th Annual Arizona Quarterly Symposium on Thursday April 16 through Saturday April 18, 2015, at the Transitional Office Building: 1731 E. Second St. (across from the softball field). The event is free and open to the public. Funded by the Department of English and Arizona Quarterly, A Journal of American Literature, Culture, and Theory. Check http...

Wednesday, October 1, 2014

Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
28
29
30
1
2
3
4
 
 
 
 
 
Oct 3 2014 - 12:00pm to 1:00pm
 
Oct 3 2014 - 4:00pm to 5:00pm
 
 
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
 
Digital Literacies Symposium Oct 6 2014 - 9:00am to Oct 11 2014 - 6:00pm
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
 
 
 
Oct 17 2014 - 4:00pm to 5:00pm
 
 
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
26
27
28
29
30
31
1
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Bookshelf

Swamp Isthmus by Joshua Marie Wilkinson

Swamp Isthmus takes the stripped, lyric voice of Selenography, the first book of Wilkinson’s No Volta pentalogy, and confronts a pre-apocalyptic vision of American urban life. Here, the city and forest are one, as are the river and sewer. The ghost and the body are one, and the buildings and the trees, the sidewalks and the switchbacks all fuse. The poems in Swamp Isthmus create the flipside of the pastoral—the urban returns to the rural, their fates...

Jack Kerouac is Pregnant: Stories by Aurelie Sheehan

Excerpt from “Jack Kerouac Is Pregnant”
How to Be a Passenger on a Motorcycle

The motorcycle owner gets on the bike. He’s stomped on the clutch or whatever that thing is, the choke maybe. He dons his big helmet, puts on his big black gloves, lifts his leg over the hulking machine. He situates himself on the seat, revs, adjusts the mirror, and looks at you, standing on the sidewalk like an orphan. You take the cue. You tentatively put on your helmet, a white one unlike his black one, and you’...

Rhetorics of the Americas: 3114 BCE to 2012 CE by Damian Baca

This is the first work to begin to fill a gap: an understanding of discourse aimed to persuade within the Pre-Columbian Americas. The contributors in this collection offer glimpses of what those Indigenous rhetorics might have looked like and how their influences remain. The reader is invited to recognize “the invention of the Americas,” providing other ways to contemplate material life prior to contemporary capitalism, telling us about the global from long ago to current global capitalism....
Jewelry Box by Aurelie Sheehan

 

The sixty-eight short works in this collection (some only a paragraph, others a few pages) straddle memoir and fiction, exploring the nuances of sexuality, motherhood, love, and ambition. Like Lydia Davis, Aurelie Sheehan's stories are potent miniatures that blossom out from seemingly insignificant encounters and objects. Jewelry Box is a collection of intimate renderings of the life that surrounds us, just under the surface.
Aurelie Sheehan is author of two novels, History Lesson for Girls and...

The Anxiety of Everyday Objects by Aurelie Sheehan

Excerpt from Chapter One

All good secretaries will eventually find truth in the hearts of men.
Winona Bartlett, Win to her friends, might not have been the world’s best secretary, but her nature was such that serving, subservience, and coffee service came easily, and, in fact, she felt there was an inherent good in doing things well, and this determination more than equaled her actual interest in the long-term prospects at Grecko Mauster Crill. She practiced her secretarial role as a Zen...

How a Mother Weaned Her Girl from Fairy Tales: and Other Stories by Kate Bernheimer




Elegant and brutal, the stories in Kate Bernheimer's latest collection occupy a heightened landscape, where the familiar cedes to the grotesque and nonsense just as often devolves into terror. These are fairy tales out of time, renewing classic stories we think we know, like one of Bernheimer's girls, whose hands of steel turn to flowers, leaving her beautiful but alone.
Kate Bernheimer is the author of the short story collection Horse, Flower, Bird and the editor of My Mother She Killed Me...

The Colors of Nature by Alison Deming

The Colors of Nature: Culture, Identity, and the Natural World is an anthology that doesn’t operate merely as a collection of essays and poems by writers of color and their reflections about the natural world. Rather, the anthology is a sophisticated argument expertly structured around the following question: “Why is there so little ‘nature writing’ by people of color?”—Oliver de la Paz

Hope is the Thing with Feathers by Chris Cokinos

A prizewinning poet and nature writer weaves together natural history, biology, sociology, and personal narrative to tell the story of the lives, habitats, and deaths of six extinct bird species.
 
“This story – of the ghost species still haunting this continent – is full of power and mystery.”

Bill McKibben, author of The End of Nature
“I was mesmerized by this fine book and felt in reading these lost natural histories as if I had both been given a gift and had one taken away.”...

Grounds of Literary Criticism by Suresh Raval

Between the foundationalist stance that seeks to eliminate disputes by finding the right answers and the relativist postion that regards disagreements as pointless quarrels that can never be resolved, Suresh Raval advocates a refreshing new perspective: a rehabilitation of controversy that recognizes the essentially contestable nature of critical concepts.
Proposing an antifoundationalist exploration of the problems of literary criticism and theory, Raval argues that critical debates, though...

Vanishing Point by Ander Monson

In contemporary America, land of tell-all memoirs and endless reality television, what kind of person denies the opportunity to present himself in his own voice, to lead with “I”? How many layers of a life can be peeled back before the self vanishes?
In this provocative, witty series of meditations, Ander Monson faces down the idea of the memoir, grappling with the lure of self-interest and self-presentation. While setting out to describe the experience of serving as head juror at the trial of...