News & Events

Jon Riccio's (MFA 2015) poem "Eyelashes" was published in the 4th issue of Plenitude.    
Cristina Ramírez was just recently elected to serve on the National Board of Coalition of Women Scholars in the History of Rhetoric and Composition.
Cristina Ramírez received the 2014 CCCC's Research Initiative Grant with Jessica Enoch "Mestiza Rhetors: An Anthology of Latina Rhetorical Activism in North America, 1880-1920."  This was the first historiography grant to have been awarded.
Megan Kimble, MFA 2013, has a piece in the April 13 op-ed pages of the Sunday LA Times.  
Fri, 04/18/2014 - 4:00pm
Emily Lyons, "Alice’s Adventures Under Glass: Photography, Science, and Lewis Carroll’s Alice Books"
 
The topsy-turvy worlds of Wonderland and Looking-Glass land, in which rabbits talk and wear pocket watches, human babies morph into pigs, and gnats the size of chickens “rejoice” in classifying other insects, emerge out of a climate of anxious reexamination, post Darwin, of the...

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The 26th Annual Arizona Quarterly Symposium Apr 3 2014 (All day) to Apr 5 2014 (All day)
 
 
 
 
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Apr 8 2014 - 4:00pm to 5:00pm
 
 
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Bookshelf

Crossing the River by Fenton Johnson

THE IDEA PULSED WITH ROMANCE, BUT THE ACT WAS RASH, RECKLESS – AND IRREVOCABLE.
Carrying her Confederate heritage like a flag, Martha Bragg Pickett was as stubborn as her red hair. And hungry for life. On a dare she crossed the river, leaving the safe, abstaining, Baptist, Southern side and venturing over to the dangerous, rowdy, Catholic Northern side. And when that proved less than thrilling, she marched her young self right into the (men only) Miracle Inn, which got a rise...

Gaming Matters: Art, Science, and Magic and the Computer Game Medium by Judd Ethan Ruggill and Ken S. McAllister

In Gaming Matters, Judd Ethan Ruggill and Ken S. McAllister offer a playful and provocative look at the computer game medium, arguing that games are:

Idiosyncratic, and thus difficult to apprehend using the traditional tools of media study

Irreconcilable, or complex to such a degree that developers, players, and scholars have contradictory ways of describing them

Boring, and therefore obligated to constantly make demands

on players' attention

Anachronistic, or built on age-old...

Rope by Alison Deming

Alison Hawthorne Deming ’s fourth collection of poems follows the paths of imagination into meditations on salt, love, Hurricane Katrina, Greek myth, and the search for extraterrestrial life, all linked by the poet’s faith in art as an instrument for creating meaning, beauty, and continuity—virtues diminished by the velocity and violence of our historical moment. The final long poem “The Flight,” inspired by the works of A. R. Ammons, is a twenty-first century epic poised on the verge of our...

The Computer Culture Reader. Judd Ethan Ruggill, Ken S. McAllister, and Joseph R. Chaney, eds.

The Computer Culture Reader brings together a multi-disciplinary group of scholars to probe the underlying structures and overarching implications of the ways in which people and computers collaborate in the production of meaning. The contributors navigate the heady and sometimes terrifying atmosphere surrounding the digital revolution in an attempt to take its measure through examinations of community and modes of communication, representation, information-production, learning, work, and play...
Jewelry Box by Aurelie Sheehan

 

The sixty-eight short works in this collection (some only a paragraph, others a few pages) straddle memoir and fiction, exploring the nuances of sexuality, motherhood, love, and ambition. Like Lydia Davis, Aurelie Sheehan's stories are potent miniatures that blossom out from seemingly insignificant encounters and objects. Jewelry Box is a collection of intimate renderings of the life that surrounds us, just under the surface.
Aurelie Sheehan is author of two novels, History Lesson for Girls and...

The Fallen Sky by Chris Cokinos

“Christopher Cokinos goes from pole to pole in his search for the bits of cosmos that fall onto the Earth, and the remarkable people who collect and study them. He is a natural philosopher and gifted writer who sprinkles his own kind of stardust on every page. If you have ever wished upon a falling star, this is your chance to know just what is falling, where it comes from, what it tells us about our place in the universe – and what things in life are worth wishing for.”

Chet Raymo, former...

History Lesson for Girls by Aurelie Sheehan

In her follow-up to the critically acclaimed novel The Anxiety of Everyday Objects, Aurelie Sheehan presents a moving coming-of-age story set in the disturbingly reckless and often hilariously tacky 1970s. In 1975, Alison Glass, age thirteen, moves to Connecticut with her bohemian parents and her horse, Jazz. Shy, observant, and in a back brace for scoliosis, Alison finds strength in an unlikely friendship with Kate Hamilton, the charismatic but troubled daughter of an egomaniacal New Age guru...

SCISSORS, PAPER, ROCK by Fenton Johnson

“SCISSORS, PAPER, ROCK is a book of insight and honest love; it has the lyricism of family legend, and the dead-on truthful ring of a report from the trenches. Fenton Johnson has made something wonderful here.”

Barbara Kingsolver, author of Pigs in Heaven
 
“The emotional power of SCISSORS, PAPER, ROCK resides on a plot of land in Kentucky…, [It] chronicles the courtships, the births, the deaths and the agonizing disappointments of two generations of the Hardins of Strang Knob…When we first...

Ground|Water. The Art, Design and Science of a Dry River

Ellen McMahon, Ander Monson, Beth Weinstein Eds.

Ground|Water is an ode to a dry river, the kind of river most familiar to those who dwell in Southern Arizona. It is also an experiment in making something beautiful from something that has been desecrated. And it is a strong message about community and responsibility.

Geography of the Heart by Fenton Johnson

With grace and affection, Johnson recounts the history of “how I fell in love, how I came to be with someone else, and how he came to death and how I helped, how in the end love enables us to continue beyond death.” At the same time, Johnson interweaves two stories: his own upbringing as the youngest of a Kentucky whiskey maker’s nine children, and that of his lover Larry Rose, the only child of German Jews, survivors of the Holocaust. Johnson’s writing has been described by Barbara Kingsolver...