News & Events

Fenton Johnson's essay “Power and Obedience:  Restoring Pacifism to American Politics,” which ran in Appalachian Heritage last spring, has been nominated for a Pushcart Award.  It will be the basis of his First Friday lecture at 1 pm on Friday, November 7, in MLNG 451, as part of the Convergences “War” series.
MFA student Francisco Cantú's Bowden piece went up today at Guernica.  
RCTE professor Adela C. Licona has collaboratively co-authored two community research briefs including LGBTQ Youth of Color: Discipline Disparities, School Push-Out, and the School-to-Prison Pipeline and  Gender Nonconforming Youth: Discipline Disparities, School Push-Out, and the School-to-Prison Pipeline.   Burdge, H., Licona, A. C., Hyemingway, Z. T. (2014). LGBTQ Youth of Color:...
RCTE Alum Susan Meyers is coming out with an academic book and a novel: Del Otro Lado: Literacy and Migration across the U.S.-Mexico Border   Failing the Trapeze (winner of the 2013 Nilsen Literary Prize for first novel)  
Fri, 11/07/2014 - 12:00pm
1. Professor Sonia Shiri, School of Middle Eastern and North African Studies
Revolution in Tunisia: Protest Signs, Graffiti and Facebook
 
2. Professor Fenton Johnson, Dept. of English
Power and Obedience:  Restoring Pacifism to American Politics
Throughout American history, pacifism, though never a majority sentiment, has played a role in shaping national perspectives on war and peace.  But as...
Fri, 12/05/2014 - 12:00pm

1. Professor John Warnock, Dept. of English

"Launch Control"

 

A reading from a piece about a visit in March 2012 to  a Minuteman III Launch Control Center in the missile field outside of F. E. Warren Air Force Base in Cheyenne, Wyoming

 

2. Professor Johanna Skibsrud, Dept. of English
"If I Were Human: Reflections on 100 Years of War"
Thu, 04/16/2015 (All day)
Please save the date for the 27th Annual Arizona Quarterly Symposium on Thursday April 16 through Saturday April 18, 2015, at the Transitional Office Building: 1731 E. Second St. (across from the softball field). The event is free and open to the public. Funded by the Department of English and Arizona Quarterly, A Journal of American Literature, Culture, and Theory. Check http...

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Digital Literacies Symposium Oct 6 2014 - 9:00am to Oct 11 2014 - 6:00pm
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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Bookshelf

Fifty leading writers retell myths from around the world in this dazzling follow-up to the bestselling My Mother She Killed Me, My Father He Ate Me.
Icarus flies once more. Aztec jaguar gods again stalk the earth. An American soldier designs a new kind of Trojan horse—his cremains in a bullet. Here, in beguiling guise, are your favorite mythological figures alongside characters from Indian, Punjabi, Inuit, and other traditions.
 Aimee Bender retells the myth of the Titans.
 Madeline Miller...

Hemingway and the Black Renaissance ed. by Charles Scruggs and Edward Holcomb

Noted scholars [Holcomb and Scruggs] provide a solid framework for the study of the connections between Hemingway's writing and the literary works of black writers. The collection's unity relies on defining the "Black Renaissance" as encompassing not only the Harlem Renaissance but also teh subsequent advances in black literature sustaned through and beyond the war years, the Black Arts period, and "into the present transnational phase."—Choice Review

The Available World by Ander Monson

“[Ander Monson’s] poems celebrate defiant excess. In this land of scarcity, right-living involves using up what you have, where you have it; otherwise someone might wreck, steal, or use it and you might not get any. A carpe diem for obscure, doomed youth.”—Stephen Burt

Hope is the Thing with Feathers by Chris Cokinos

A prizewinning poet and nature writer weaves together natural history, biology, sociology, and personal narrative to tell the story of the lives, habitats, and deaths of six extinct bird species.
 
“This story – of the ghost species still haunting this continent – is full of power and mystery.”

Bill McKibben, author of The End of Nature
“I was mesmerized by this fine book and felt in reading these lost natural histories as if I had both been given a gift and had one taken away.”...

Fluency in Play: Computer Game Design for Less Commonly Taught Language Pedagogy by Judd Ethan Ruggill and Ken S. McAllister

Fluency in Play was written to provide K-16 teachers with an introduction to designing and building computer games for the foreign language classroom. At the heart of the book is the fact that computer games make excellent teaching tools. They combine two of the fundamental processes of new language acquisition—play and exploration—with the power and pleasures of fun. Computer games are also dynamic, scalable, and ductile; they can be drawn out and shaped to fit an infinite number of classroom...

AZ 100 Indie Films: A State of Arizona Centennial Celebration by Judd Ethan Ruggill, Ken S. McAllister

A catalog of the 100 films selected by the Arizona Media Arts Center to celebrate the 2012 Centennial of Arizona statehood. Includes copious film and filmmaker information, a guide to film themes for teachers and scholars, and a still from each film. Black & White with Color cover. 200 pages.

How a Mother Weaned Her Girl from Fairy Tales: and Other Stories by Kate Bernheimer




Elegant and brutal, the stories in Kate Bernheimer's latest collection occupy a heightened landscape, where the familiar cedes to the grotesque and nonsense just as often devolves into terror. These are fairy tales out of time, renewing classic stories we think we know, like one of Bernheimer's girls, whose hands of steel turn to flowers, leaving her beautiful but alone.
Kate Bernheimer is the author of the short story collection Horse, Flower, Bird and the editor of My Mother She Killed Me...

History Lesson for Girls by Aurelie Sheehan

In her follow-up to the critically acclaimed novel The Anxiety of Everyday Objects, Aurelie Sheehan presents a moving coming-of-age story set in the disturbingly reckless and often hilariously tacky 1970s. In 1975, Alison Glass, age thirteen, moves to Connecticut with her bohemian parents and her horse, Jazz. Shy, observant, and in a back brace for scoliosis, Alison finds strength in an unlikely friendship with Kate Hamilton, the charismatic but troubled daughter of an egomaniacal New Age guru...

Geography of the Heart by Fenton Johnson

With grace and affection, Johnson recounts the history of “how I fell in love, how I came to be with someone else, and how he came to death and how I helped, how in the end love enables us to continue beyond death.” At the same time, Johnson interweaves two stories: his own upbringing as the youngest of a Kentucky whiskey maker’s nine children, and that of his lover Larry Rose, the only child of German Jews, survivors of the Holocaust. Johnson’s writing has been described by Barbara Kingsolver...

The Computer Culture Reader. Judd Ethan Ruggill, Ken S. McAllister, and Joseph R. Chaney, eds.

The Computer Culture Reader brings together a multi-disciplinary group of scholars to probe the underlying structures and overarching implications of the ways in which people and computers collaborate in the production of meaning. The contributors navigate the heady and sometimes terrifying atmosphere surrounding the digital revolution in an attempt to take its measure through examinations of community and modes of communication, representation, information-production, learning, work, and play...