News & Events

Amy Kimme Hea (RCTE Associate Professor and Writing Program Director), Aimee Mapes (Assistant Writing Program Director), and RCTE doctoral students Kenny Walker and Ana Ribero have been awarded a $10,000 Research Initiative grant from the Conference on College Composition and Communication (CCCC) for their project "The University of Arizona Longitudinal Study of Student Writers."   This is the...
Katie Silvester, doctoral student in RCTE, has received a $20,000 American Fellowship from the American Association of University Women (AAUW).  AAUW is the nation's leading voice promoting equity and education for women and girls,  empowering women as individuals and as a community since 1881.  For more than 130 years, AAUW has worked together as a national grassroots organization to improve the...
RCTE Graduate Student, Rachael Wendler, has received the highly competitive $15,000 Scholar's Award from the P.E.O. Sisterhood. The P.E.O. Scholar Awards was established in 1991 to provide substantial merit-based awards for women in the US and Canada who are pursuing a doctoral level degree at an accredited college or university. Founded January 21, 1869, at Iowa Wesleyan College, the P.E.O....
Sarah Schoenbrun (MFA 2012) has an essay, "Ekphrasis," in Seneca Review.
Fri, 04/25/2014 - 6:00pm
Come travel with us from Kansas to the Emerald City through film, art, music, and stories in an evening celebrating the 75th anniversary of the movie The Wizard of Oz. This event features readings from L. Frank Baum's wonderful Oz series, on which the movie was based.
Excerpts feature - of course - beloved Dorothy and her "meat dog," as Toto's referred to early on in this weird little book. But...

April 2014

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The 26th Annual Arizona Quarterly Symposium Apr 3 2014 (All day) to Apr 5 2014 (All day)
 
 
 
 
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Apr 8 2014 - 4:00pm to 5:00pm
 
 
Apr 10 2014 - 3:30pm to 4:30pm
 
 
 
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Apr 18 2014 - 4:00pm to 5:00pm
 
 
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Apr 25 2014 - 6:00pm to 8:00pm
 
 
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Bookshelf

The Making of Barack Obama: The Politics of Persuasion by Matthew Abraham

 “From the inspiring slogans and speeches of his campaign to the eloquent successes and failures of his presidency, Barack Obama has been extravagantly praised and sarcastically criticized for the distinctive power of his rhetoric. The essays in this collection persuasively analyze that rhetoric in all its specific tactics and general strategies, in its idealist yearnings and its pragmatic compromises, in its ambitious strivings and its political obstacles.”
President’s Professor of...

Geography of the Heart by Fenton Johnson

With grace and affection, Johnson recounts the history of “how I fell in love, how I came to be with someone else, and how he came to death and how I helped, how in the end love enables us to continue beyond death.” At the same time, Johnson interweaves two stories: his own upbringing as the youngest of a Kentucky whiskey maker’s nine children, and that of his lover Larry Rose, the only child of German Jews, survivors of the Holocaust. Johnson’s writing has been described by Barbara Kingsolver...

Approaches to Teaching Faulkner's As I Lay Dying edited by Lynda Zwinger and Patrick O'Donnell

As I Lay Dying is considered by many both the most enigmatic and the most accessible of Faulkner's major works. This volume of essays, with contributions by Cedric Gael Bryant, Barbara Ladd, John T. Matthews, Homer B. Pettey, and others provides "an aid that should help both new teachers and veterans to teach [As I Lay Dying] more fully and effectively."—Gail L. Mortimer
Jewelry Box by Aurelie Sheehan

 

The sixty-eight short works in this collection (some only a paragraph, others a few pages) straddle memoir and fiction, exploring the nuances of sexuality, motherhood, love, and ambition. Like Lydia Davis, Aurelie Sheehan's stories are potent miniatures that blossom out from seemingly insignificant encounters and objects. Jewelry Box is a collection of intimate renderings of the life that surrounds us, just under the surface.
Aurelie Sheehan is author of two novels, History Lesson for Girls and...

Mestiz@ Scripts, Digital Migrations, and the Territories of Writing by Damian Baca

 

Conventional scholarship on written communication positions the Western alphabet as a precondition for literacy. Thus, pictographic, non-verbal writing practices of Mesoamerica remain obscured by representations of lettered speech. This book examines how contemporary Mestiz@ scripts challenge alphabetic dominance, thereby undermining the colonized territories of "writing." Strategic weavings of Aztec and European inscription systems not only promote historically-grounded accounts of how...

Hope is the Thing with Feathers by Chris Cokinos

A prizewinning poet and nature writer weaves together natural history, biology, sociology, and personal narrative to tell the story of the lives, habitats, and deaths of six extinct bird species.
 
“This story – of the ghost species still haunting this continent – is full of power and mystery.”

Bill McKibben, author of The End of Nature
“I was mesmerized by this fine book and felt in reading these lost natural histories as if I had both been given a gift and had one taken away.”...

Rope by Alison Deming

Alison Hawthorne Deming ’s fourth collection of poems follows the paths of imagination into meditations on salt, love, Hurricane Katrina, Greek myth, and the search for extraterrestrial life, all linked by the poet’s faith in art as an instrument for creating meaning, beauty, and continuity—virtues diminished by the velocity and violence of our historical moment. The final long poem “The Flight,” inspired by the works of A. R. Ammons, is a twenty-first century epic poised on the verge of our...

The Fallen Sky by Chris Cokinos

“Christopher Cokinos goes from pole to pole in his search for the bits of cosmos that fall onto the Earth, and the remarkable people who collect and study them. He is a natural philosopher and gifted writer who sprinkles his own kind of stardust on every page. If you have ever wished upon a falling star, this is your chance to know just what is falling, where it comes from, what it tells us about our place in the universe – and what things in life are worth wishing for.”

Chet Raymo, former...

Game Work: Language, Power, and Computer Game Culture by Ken S. McAllister

As the popularity of computer games has exploded over the past decade, both scholars and game industry professionals have recognized the necessity of treating games less as frivolous entertainment and more as artifacts of culture worthy of political, social, economic, rhetorical, and aesthetic analysis. Ken McAllister notes in his introduction to Game Work that, even though games are essentially impractical, they are nevertheless important mediating agents for the broad exercise of socio-...
Fifty leading writers retell myths from around the world in this dazzling follow-up to the bestselling My Mother She Killed Me, My Father He Ate Me.
Icarus flies once more. Aztec jaguar gods again stalk the earth. An American soldier designs a new kind of Trojan horse—his cremains in a bullet. Here, in beguiling guise, are your favorite mythological figures alongside characters from Indian, Punjabi, Inuit, and other traditions.
 Aimee Bender retells the myth of the Titans.
 Madeline Miller...