News & Events

Kenny Walker, RCTE Ph.D. student's publication entitled “A Choreography of Living Texts: Selections from the ARST Oral History Project” has been published in Rhetoric Review.  
Jan Bindas-Tenney's essay "How to do Laundry" is forthcoming in Issue #9 of Cactus Heart Press and her essay "Bow Down Bitches" is featured as part of a queer summer web feature in CutBank Literary Magazine's "All Accounts and Mixture"
Alison Hawthorne Deming's new nonfiction book Zoologies: On Animals and Human Spirit will be out in early fall. Essays from the collection are coming out in journals include "Patativa," "Chimera" and "Bobcat" in The Georgia Review;  "The Sacred Pig" in Eleven Eleven; "The Cheetah Run" in terrain.org, "The Pony, The Pig, The Horse" in Ecotone and "...
Cathy de la Cruz (MFA 2014) has a new short short story in Whiskypaper  
Fri, 09/05/2014 - 12:00pm
Opening Panel, featuring Lee Medovoi and Charlie Scruggs (English Department) and other faculty. 
Fri, 11/07/2014 - 12:00pm
Fenton Johnson, Dept. of English
 
Fri, 12/05/2014 - 12:00pm
John Warnock, Dept. of English
Johanna Skibsrud, Dept. of English

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Bookshelf

What You See in the Dark by Manuel Muñoz

“You’ll understand one day, her mother had said at the bus station. When you find a man of your own, you’ll know why you’ll run toward him.”
A penetrating look at people searching for meaning and authenticity in lives played out under watchful eyes, this thoroughly original work is intense and fascinating in its juxtapositions of tenderness and menace, violence and regret, and its atmosphere recreation of a place on a brink of change.

Genius Loci by Alison Deming

From a poet and essayist whose writing about nature has won her comparisons with Gary Snyder and Terry Tempest Williams comes a new collection that offers further evidence of her ability to trace the intersections of the human and nonhuman worlds. The title poem is a lyrical excavation of the city of Prague, where layers of history, culture and nature have accumulated to form “a genius loci”—a guardian spirit.
From Penguin.Com
 

The Colors of Nature by Alison Deming

The Colors of Nature: Culture, Identity, and the Natural World is an anthology that doesn’t operate merely as a collection of essays and poems by writers of color and their reflections about the natural world. Rather, the anthology is a sophisticated argument expertly structured around the following question: “Why is there so little ‘nature writing’ by people of color?”—Oliver de la Paz

Ground|Water. The Art, Design and Science of a Dry River

Ellen McMahon, Ander Monson, Beth Weinstein Eds.

Ground|Water is an ode to a dry river, the kind of river most familiar to those who dwell in Southern Arizona. It is also an experiment in making something beautiful from something that has been desecrated. And it is a strong message about community and responsibility.

The Available World by Ander Monson

“[Ander Monson’s] poems celebrate defiant excess. In this land of scarcity, right-living involves using up what you have, where you have it; otherwise someone might wreck, steal, or use it and you might not get any. A carpe diem for obscure, doomed youth.”—Stephen Burt

Gaming Matters: Art, Science, and Magic and the Computer Game Medium by Judd Ethan Ruggill and Ken S. McAllister

In Gaming Matters, Judd Ethan Ruggill and Ken S. McAllister offer a playful and provocative look at the computer game medium, arguing that games are:

Idiosyncratic, and thus difficult to apprehend using the traditional tools of media study

Irreconcilable, or complex to such a degree that developers, players, and scholars have contradictory ways of describing them

Boring, and therefore obligated to constantly make demands

on players' attention

Anachronistic, or built on age-old...
Jewelry Box by Aurelie Sheehan

 

The sixty-eight short works in this collection (some only a paragraph, others a few pages) straddle memoir and fiction, exploring the nuances of sexuality, motherhood, love, and ambition. Like Lydia Davis, Aurelie Sheehan's stories are potent miniatures that blossom out from seemingly insignificant encounters and objects. Jewelry Box is a collection of intimate renderings of the life that surrounds us, just under the surface.
Aurelie Sheehan is author of two novels, History Lesson for Girls and...

Hope is the Thing with Feathers by Chris Cokinos

A prizewinning poet and nature writer weaves together natural history, biology, sociology, and personal narrative to tell the story of the lives, habitats, and deaths of six extinct bird species.
 
“This story – of the ghost species still haunting this continent – is full of power and mystery.”

Bill McKibben, author of The End of Nature
“I was mesmerized by this fine book and felt in reading these lost natural histories as if I had both been given a gift and had one taken away.”...
Manuel Muñoz's dazzling second collection finds the author returning, once again, to the small towns of California's Central Valley. Set in a neighborhood with characters whose lives often intersect with each other, The Faith Healer of Olive Avenue offers ten stories about a wide range of lives: a mother coping with a mortally injured son after his motorcycle accident; a single father returning from San Francisco and attempting a reconciliation with an estranged sister; a young woman...

Hemingway and the Black Renaissance ed. by Charles Scruggs and Edward Holcomb

Noted scholars [Holcomb and Scruggs] provide a solid framework for the study of the connections between Hemingway's writing and the literary works of black writers. The collection's unity relies on defining the "Black Renaissance" as encompassing not only the Harlem Renaissance but also teh subsequent advances in black literature sustaned through and beyond the war years, the Black Arts period, and "into the present transnational phase."—Choice Review